Chris Kyle’s Death May Cause PTSD Scare

February 26, 2013 |

Chris Kyle

Former SEAL Chris Kyle was so effective as a soldier that an $80,000 bounty was placed on his head, but it was a fellow veteran struggling to cope with civilian life that killed him. Eddie Ray Routh, accused of murdering Chris, is a former Marine who spent four years in the military. U.S. News reports that Tommy Bryant, the Erath County Sheriff, conjectured that Routh, “may have been suffering from some type of mental illness from being in the military himself.” With veterans already struggling to find work and PTSD myths and misinformation a problem in the workforce, some say that this case might cause further damage and perpetuate stereotypes. John E. Pickens, executive director of VeteransPlus and the Yellow Ribbon Registry Network, said that, “I’m not sure how to address that (stigma) because for those people who read something like this and take away a negative impression, it’s very difficult.”

Veteran advocates are constantly trying to dampen rumors about PTSD, and there are plenty of inaccuracies to go around. Dr. Harry Croft, a psychiatrist who’s worked with over 7,000 veterans, has said that, “The myth is all of them have PTSD  — not true, only 20 percent.  Another myth is that all of them who have a severe case of it — not true; it goes from very mild to severe. The third myth is that everybody with PTSD is aggressive, unreliable, or trouble in the workplace, and none of that is (true) either.” Ed Richardson, an Iraq War veteran, says he’s noticed the stigmas trickle down to hiring managers. He noted changes in body language and open questions about his mental health. “Some ask me: ‘Have you had any issues? Because some veterans have had the problems.’” Richardson said.

PTSD is an ongoing concern for many veterans, and if you or a loved one could use some extra support, the Military.com PTSD section provides consistently updated information.

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Comments

  1. Anthony says:

    DR. HARRY CROFT DOES NOT HAVE ANY IDEA WHAT PTSD HAS DONE TO THE VIETNAM VETS. THESE ARE NOT MYTHS BUT TRUE FASTS.AND THERE
    ARE MORE THEN 20% THAT ARE SUFFERING LIKE MY SELF DAY AND NIGHT .HAVING NIGHT MERES AND SLEEPLESS NIGHTS.WAKING UP WET FROM SWEATING, NOT WANTING TO BE IN CROWDS., WHEN GOING OUT IN PUBLIC I'M ALWAYS LOOKING BEHIND MY SHOULDER. SITTING DOWN ANY WERE WITH MY BACK TOWARDS THE WALL AND MAKING SURE I'M LOOKING AT THE DOORS OR ENTRANCE! THATS ONLY SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I GO THREW. AND MANY OF US VIETNAM VETS .MY WIFES CAN TESTIFY TO THAT. ANTHONY

    • Junebug2983 says:

      People just don't get it someetimes I think that the civilian population think of us vietnam Vets as if we didn't fight for just cause. and we aren't suffering as the guys from this Bush Fabraicated threat war. Our sufferring is real for both WAR VET and non combat vets who have assisted in the war efforts and have witness things our Civilian counter parts could never imagen. Many of us attempt to deal with PTSD in our own way a lot of times by trying to surpress our emotions and feeling of what we are going through at the time just to fit in. there are time it work well and other times it does not. When you find yourself constant looking over your shoulder or stand with your back up against the wall so people may pass you by cause you feel they'er checking you out or attempting to come up on you! then you catch your self an say "man stop it I'm home I'm safe now" it's not what